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"Far Side of the World" - Chapters 1 and 2 - "You didn't hear about the polar bear?"
March 24th, 2006
10:42 pm

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"Far Side of the World" - Chapters 1 and 2
Behind an lj-cut, to spare the non-MAC-inclined.... *G*

Me first, Gilly???? *meep* But... but... I like it when YOU have to type out all the long damn passages - *L*! And I didn't have a pen with me... you're right; it really helps to underline things!

Blake inventing a change to carronades that makes them twice as good, "virtually putting an nd to war"? *L*! Bet Jack didn't like hearing that!

I wonder what, exactly, a pen-wiper looks like... *G*

Fun reading the various memos that Sir Francis keeps sending out - about women and the use of fresh water and all that other stuff - adds a lot of realism to the Naval life.

"...unnecessary repeated instructions about cleanliness and appearance to his coxswain..." I should say SO! Darn... one thing I would have loved to see in the movie is Bonden all dressed up in his finery, ribbons along the seams and all.

"For the Navy, though often reduced to eating salt horse and hard tack, ate it in style" - yay!

Lot of repeat ground covered here, to catch people up on what happened in the other books. Hollom! Yep, the same one as in the movie... but not. *G* I'll let you see the difference, but he IS a Jonah.

Sutton: "You look most uncommon hipped, Jack, like a cat that has lost its kittens" - awwwww...

Yay! They got the French ships! WHOOOOT! And, as we find out later in Chapter 2, Sir Francis also sees it as a victory (double yay!). Whew.

You know... how do they "clean" the head? Isn't the head basically a seat on the bowsprit, with a hole in it?

I wonder what Sutton meant about how, if all the midshipmen had curls like Absalom and stole silver watches, they could "hardly go aloft without danger"? Danger of being molested?!? *meep*

So, what did you think of Mr. Fielding? *G* Is it just jealousy, or is he as great a thick-headed lout as Jack and Stephen think him?

The little skit parody that Sutton recites... I didn't find it terribly funny the first time, but now I wonder if it's a direct parody of a famous passage from the Bible?

Ah, Diane... remember the little anecdote that Stephen recollected in the previous book, about his pet falcon? That... is Diane. She will NOT be slighted, no matter how hypocritical it sounds, considering that she's been a mistress more than once. And notice who is going to be carrying the letter intended to calm her feathers. *shakes head*

Yet another almost-fall by Stephen - AND a listing of the many times he HAS slipped... I think I win the argument; he is NOT getting better.

Interesting how all the spies that get caught keep "killing themselves"... only not.

God... I don't remember realizing last time that Wray may have been trying to kill THREE birds with one stone: Jack, Stephen - AND his father-in-law, Harte!

Isn't it interesting how etiquette works in those days? It's "improper" for Pocock to ask Stephen why he's going up on the rock of Gibralter, and "improper" for Stephen to ask Pocock what the Admiral thought of Zambra. Why?

Love how Jack is honestly happy for Sir Francis! And, even better, how the peerage obviously put Sir Francis in the very best mood towards Jack. And now you see how the Surprise was saved for another day - AND why Pullings was in the movie - two things that I know must have been making you scratch your head. *G* And Jack's dilemma, common to all bosses - wanting to do right by his underlings, but not wanting to lose them all due to promotion.

I KNOW you loved this (when Killick sees Pullings on board):

"Then seeing Pullings his acid, housewifely face broke into a smile; he put a knuckle to his forehead and said, "My kind duty, sir, and hope I see you well?"

Have you ever heard Killick speak so politely? My word!

"Never was such a Behemoth of vice as that Cooper; Lucifer ain't in it." Just love the language.

Heneage Dundas - the Wilson to Jack's House, on the rare occasions when Jack is feeling pissy.

Of course, the Doctor being pulled off of the heights of Gibraltar by Bonden after the poor midshipman was so rudely abused by Maturin - send in the Marines! And Martin's description of watching the birds: "Paradise must be like this." And Stephen's answer: "Perhaps a little less harsh and angular."

"You can see her pale, well-rounded thighs, almost white." Now there's an interesting comment out of context - *L*!

"Killick's shrill, indignant, shrewish voice, a cross betwen that of a much-tried long-soured nursemaid and of an uncommonly rough tarpaulin-hatted tobacco-chewing foremast-hand"

Okay, the bit with MacBeth? O'Brian's own weakness for bad jokes like Jack's. *G*

Deodands?

*ggl* Love all the politicoes making jokes about the zoological lingo of the Navy - Stephen: "It is my belief that they have raised a mouse, and that having seized it with a fox they will clap on a lizard." - *LOL*!!!! *gives Stephen armfuls of points*

I'm still trying to imagine this strange human chain the three of them made getting off the ship...

*L*! p. 62 - Lord, I thought I remembered that bit about boarding a woman from the first novel! In fact... I bet he did say something similar there. *S*

*rolls eyes at the rainbow bargecrew* Although... perhaps it's a gay ship?

Oh, god... the bit about Cadmus? Where Jack is perfectly ignorant and won't admit it, so he tells the whaler that it might not be proper for him to tell him in public, with ladies about? *snorfle*

Sorry... only got up to p. 66. *G* Let's face it... I'm just not a gilly.

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From:alassenya
Date:March 25th, 2006 10:34 am (UTC)
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A pen-wiper is simply a piece of cloth (which may or may not be decorated) used to wipe the nib of a dipping pen. I tend to use tissues myself, but you can use anything. I have a vague memory of a pen-wiper made of flannel being one of the Christmas presents Katy bought in "What Katy Did".

I tried trimming a quill a few months ago and I found out first-hand the value of a good pen-knife - it has to be very sharp and very strong to cut a quill properly.

The "head" was indeed a wooden seat. The problem was that the ship was moving foward as ...erm... the bowl contents were moving downward, hence the bow became somewhat encrusted. Scraping it all off was a job reserved for someone under punishment. *g*
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From:alassenya
Date:March 25th, 2006 10:35 am (UTC)
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And that was supposed to read "bowel contents" - stupid typos.
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From:tootsiemuppet
Date:March 25th, 2006 11:41 am (UTC)
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Fun reading the various memos that Sir Francis keeps sending out - about women and the use of fresh water and all that other stuff - adds a lot of realism to the Naval life

Heh, yeah, though I could see all at once why everyone thought him a prick. Tsh. Telling them how to dress. :p

Bonden all dressed up in his finery, ribbons along the seams and all.
YES! Bonden is always so very respectable in his clothing, I love it. *G*

About Hollom, I was all gleeful at first, because "omg he's really in here!"... and then a split-second later I pitied him immensely. I know Weir changed his storyline a lot, though, so I'm prepared for some changes.

You know... how do they "clean" the head?
There's a bit in M&C where I think it was Mowett was explaining the head to Stephen, and Stephen asks something to the effect of "But what happens in inclement weather?' 'They still go to the heads, sir.' and I immediately got a very nasty picture of someone, ehr, there during a storm or choppy sea. Ick.
That said, that was the same passage that always makes me slightly uncomfortable looking at those pictures of ships that are taken from right under the bowsprit, making the ship look all majestic and tall. You just know what's there now. That kind of spoils it.


Danger of being molested?!? *meep*
Not as exciting as that, I'm afraid. I didn't get it either at first so I ran a google check, and the first picture I got when I image googled "Absolom" was this poor fellow:

I imagine he'd get caught in the rigging or something.

Ack, we've got company and I need to get dressed.

Will be back with the rest later. :p
[User Picture]
From:tootsiemuppet
Date:March 25th, 2006 01:21 pm (UTC)

On Absolom

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From here

Absalom, whose name means "father of peace" was the third son of David by Maachah, daughter of Taimai, king of Geshur.

His life was one of turmoil. For example, by his order the servants murdered his half brother Ammon for having violated his sister Tamar. Afterward, through his beauty, luxuriant hair (2 Samuel 14:25,26), splendid retinue, fair speeches and courtesies, he "stole the hearts of the men of Israel" (2 Samuel 15:2-6), and rebelled against his father. A decisive battle was fought in the wood of Eephraim. Absalom was defeated, his long hair became entangled in the branches of a terebinth (or oak), where he was left hanging, his mule running away from him.

Later on during his life, Absalom plotted to take the throne away from his father. He was killed in an attempt to usurp the throne by Joab, one of David's men. King David had considerable grief over this.

___

Beauty, fair speeches and courtesies, pretty curly hair? And stealing the hearts of men? It looks like we were both right. *L*
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From:rosamundeb
Date:March 25th, 2006 02:41 pm (UTC)

Re: On Absolom

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Hmmm... I don't think that was the same "stealing of the hearts of men" that I meant... *G*

Poor David and Absalom!
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From:tootsiemuppet
Date:March 25th, 2006 01:23 pm (UTC)
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Ahem, the picture.

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From:tootsiemuppet
Date:March 25th, 2006 01:24 pm (UTC)
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Huh, it's back now. Strange. Well, ehr...*cough* now you've got it twice. *blush*
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From:rosamundeb
Date:March 25th, 2006 02:28 pm (UTC)
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AHA! Absalom, Absalom! Thank you so much. You know, I've heard his name before, but I'll have to check him out more.

Yes - about the head... *G*. Too bad your MAC DVD is daid, or you could SEE a picture of somebody using the head in inclement weather. When they get so far south that there's ice on all the rigging? And, to show it, they do a beautiful long shot all along the side of the boat?

There somebody up at the head, sitting, with his pants down.

Yep! I caught that! *very smug*
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From:tootsiemuppet
Date:March 25th, 2006 01:13 pm (UTC)
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Fielding *L* Actually I was thinking he'd made great progress since the last book. He's smiling again anygate anyway, and he didn't seem too hostile toward Jack. Did he?

The biblical parody didn't strike me as very funny either, but then what knowledge do I have of Scripture? I'll see what I can find in a minute. *lays out her Research Maiden superhero uniform*

And notice who is going to be carrying the letter intended to calm her feathers. *shakes head*
Diana. I just really hope she isn't going to do anything rash. It'll take a while for that letter to arrive, even IF it is delivered speedily, which I don't want to put too much faith in. I can well see her diving into other arms just out of spite.
(Grah, I hate him putting such faith in Wray.)

I think I win the argument; he is NOT getting better.
Or more confident. ^^; You win. Bless his clumsy soul. You'd think he'd have learned by now.

God... I don't remember realizing last time that Wray may have been trying to kill THREE birds with one stone: Jack, Stephen - AND his father-in-law, Harte!
I want to do so very nasty things to Wray, you have no idea. Seriously. There are no limits to the things I think him capable of.

It's "improper" for Pocock to ask Stephen why he's going up on the rock of Gibralter, and "improper" for Stephen to ask Pocock what the Admiral thought of Zambra. Why?
Because it bears no correllation to the matter at hand? Because Stephen might well get up to some very private business up on the Rock of Gibraltar, which he might be embarrassed to admit to in polite company. ;)
And for a surgeon to question an Admiral on official business might not be the thing either.

And now you see how the Surprise was saved for another day - AND why Pullings was in the movie - two things that I know must have been making you scratch your head.
YESSS!
And this puts the movie in such a different light as well, especially the end where Pullings gets the Acheron. Huzzah for Captain Pullings indeed! He might just live up to his title now!
I didn't know how much they'd changed from the novel to the movie, so I wasn't sure Pullings was even going to be present in this one. I figured he wasn't, because of his rank and because I wasn't aware that one could just volunteer. Is he on the exact same footing now as Mowett or is he still above him? I know there's a post called "lieutenant and commander", which could slot inbetween a first lieutenant and a commander. (Come to think of it, wasn't Jack a lt. and comm. in M&C?)
And him wearing his hat fore and aft. I thought that was the way lieutenants wore theirs when I saw the film, and NOW it's been explained that that's the new official way to wear them. I love it. Of course the epaulettes stay in Killick's careful care. ^_^

"Then seeing Pullings his acid, housewifely face broke into a smile; he put a knuckle to his forehead and said, "My kind duty, sir, and hope I see you well?"
Haha, YES, I did love that bit. Bless him. I really do love Killick. *L*

Heneage Dundas - the Wilson to Jack's House, on the rare occasions when Jack is feeling pissy.
I love how Hen keeps popping up more and more now, I really do. Jack can unload to him, especially about stuff Stephen wouldn't give a fart about. He needs compassion, the dear soul.

[User Picture]
From:tootsiemuppet
Date:March 25th, 2006 01:34 pm (UTC)
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I um.. suck as a research maiden. I have no idea if it's meant to be a parody of a particular passage or just a parody of biblical texts in general.

*blush*
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From:tootsiemuppet
Date:March 25th, 2006 01:13 pm (UTC)
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Of course, the Doctor being pulled off of the heights of Gibraltar by Bonden after the poor midshipman was so rudely abused by Maturin - send in the Marines!
Don't you love how Stephen has someone to geek with now? Not to mention someone to feel vaguely superior over with all his nautical knowledge *snerk*. He always used to be on his own, and now it's this exceedingly comfortable and companionable twosome and I just can't help but smile at the mental image of the two of them chasing that mid right back off the hill.

"Killick's shrill, indignant, shrewish voice, a cross betwen that of a much-tried long-soured nursemaid and of an uncommonly rough tarpaulin-hatted tobacco-chewing foremast-hand"

BEST LINE EVER!

Okay, the bit with MacBeth? O'Brian's own weakness for bad jokes like Jack's. *G*
My thoughts exactly. I'm afraid I'm a bit ahead of you, but he uses it again, too. *L* I couldn't help but be reminded of Jack when he's so particularly proud of a bad joke that he repeats and repeats it (usually only to his own delight).


Deodands?
\De"o*dand`\, n. [LL. deodandum, fr. L. Deo dandum to be given to God.] (Old Eng. Law) A personal chattel which had caused the death of a person, and for that reason was given to God, that is, forfeited to the crown, to be applied to pious uses, and distributed in alms by the high almoner. Thus, if a cart ran over a man and killed him, it was forfeited as a deodand.

Note: Deodands are unknown in American law, and in 1846 were abolished in England.

I actually knew about this, since we used to have the same thing once upon a time and it came up in history class in high school. I probably only remembered because it was weird, though. ;)

"It is my belief that they have raised a mouse, and that having seized it with a fox they will clap on a lizard." - *LOL*!!!! *gives Stephen armfuls of points*
Now, what is it that he actually said, do you think?
*hums*
MOUSE: A kind of ball or knob, wrought upon the collar of the stays.
FOX: Small cordage made by twisting together two or more strands of tarred yarn.
LIZARD: A bight of a small line pointed on a large one.

I can't find his hounds, though. *G*

*rolls eyes at the rainbow bargecrew* Although... perhaps it's a gay ship?
*GROAN*, Ros!

Oh, god... the bit about Cadmus? Where Jack is perfectly ignorant and won't admit it, so he tells the whaler that it might not be proper for him to tell him in public, with ladies about? *snorfle*
And now the other fellow is going to walk off, read up on this Cadmus fellow and keep thining he must have missed something. *L*
[User Picture]
From:tootsiemuppet
Date:March 25th, 2006 02:04 pm (UTC)

SPAM, GILLY, SPAM!

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Now, what did you make of this?

[On polyandry]
'I am no great advocate for it,' said Stephen, reaching for his 'cello. 'Nor even for a plurality of wives. Indeed, there are moments when I wonder whether any satisfactory relation is possible between men and ... ' He checked himself and went on, '[...]'
[User Picture]
From:rosamundeb
Date:March 25th, 2006 02:46 pm (UTC)

Re: SPAM, GILLY, SPAM!

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Ah, yes... you mentioned that earlier! *G* Poor Stephen... so worried!
[User Picture]
From:alassenya
Date:March 27th, 2006 07:46 am (UTC)
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Missed one - a "Deodand" is anything non-human that has caused the death of a man, and it is forfeit to the Church, to be disposed of for charity. Usually applied to horses and ploughs and things like that. Abolished (in UK) in 1862, but a prominent part of medieval and renaissance law.
[User Picture]
From:rosamundeb
Date:March 27th, 2006 09:47 pm (UTC)
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Yep... very strange!
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