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The trailer for "Narnia" is out... and it's beautiful...! - "You didn't hear about the polar bear?"
May 7th, 2005
10:49 pm

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The trailer for "Narnia" is out... and it's beautiful...!
Wow. This just looks... so right... so beautiful. I think I'm in love. The trailer is here. I have cable modem, and the large version worked great for me, just fyi.

http://movies.channel.aol.com/franchise/exclusives/chronicles_of_narnia_movie

And I was looking at www.imdb.com about STAR WARS... and found some great trivia (a long list, somewhat edited):


Trivia for
Star Wars (1977)

Carrie Fisher considered losing weight for the role of Princess Leia, but she and George Lucas decided against it.

William Katt (star of "The Greatest American Hero" (1981)) auditioned for the role of Luke Skywalker.

Stunt doubles were not used for the scene in which Luke and Leia swing to safety. Carrie Fisher and Mark Hamill performed that stunt themselves, shooting it in just one take.

At one point, George Lucas planned for the characters of Luke Skywalker and his aunt and uncle, to be midgets.

At one point, George Lucas had planned the character of Han Solo to be a huge green-skinned monster with no nose and gills.

George Lucas based the character of Han Solo on his friend, director Francis Ford Coppola.

Kurt Russell, Nick Nolte, Christopher Walken, and Perry King were all candidates for the role of Han Solo, as George Lucas wanted to stay away from any actors he had previously used in his films. Harrison Ford (who had played Bob Falfa in Lucas's American Graffiti (1973)) read the part of Han Solo for screen tests of other characters but wasn't originally considered for the part. During these tests George Lucas realized Harrison Ford was perfect for the role.

According to Mark Hamill, studio executives were unhappy that Chewbacca has no clothes and attempted to have the costume redesigned with shorts.

The studio was unhappy with Star Wars as a title after negative market testing. A competition was held during shooting for cast and crew to come up with a better one but nothing stuck.

The "TIE" in TIE Fighter is an acronym. It stands for "Twin Ion Engines".

20th Century Fox promoted the film at the San Diego Comic Con, believing the attendees of that event to be the film's main target demographic.

The following characters "have a bad feeling about this": Luke and Han. See also Star Wars: Episode V - The Empire Strikes Back (1980), and Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi (1983).

The origin of R2-D2 can be found in the "drones" Huey, Dewey, and Louie from the film Silent Running (1972). Upon meeting Douglas Trumbull, director and special effects chief on Silent Running (1972), George Lucas commented on how much he liked the designs of Douglas Trumbull's two-footed robots in the film (which were operated by bilateral amputees). Four years later, a functionally similar design appeared as R2-D2 in "Star Wars". Universal Studios, the distributor of Silent Running, noted the similarity between the robots (and the similarity of "Star Wars" to the Buck Rogers (1939) serials of the '30s), and promptly sued 20th Century Fox for infringement. The lawsuit was eventually settled when Fox countersued over Battlestar Galactica (1978) (TV), which bore a striking resemblance to "Star Wars".

Though the only thing Chewbacca can say from start to finish is a Wookiee growl, he has the last line in the film.

Luke went through several changes. He started out as a woman, then he was a dwarf, then he was a 60 year-old general then his name was changed from Luke Starkiller to Luke Skywalker.

Production was so laden with problems that George Lucas worked himself into poor health. He had to be checked into the hospital after suffering from hypertension.

7 foot 2 Peter Mayhew got the role of Chewbacca 10 seconds after he met George Lucas. All he did was stand up.

During the scene on the Death Star right after Ben leaves to shut down the tractor beam, Chewbacca barks something to Luke to which Han says "Boy, you said it Chewie". Backstage footage reveals that what Chewie says is "The old man's gone mad".

Darth Vader was the first character that George Lucas created for the story.

The lightsaber sound effect is a combination of the hum of an idling 35mm movie projector and the feedback generated by passing a stripped microphone cable by a television.

20th Century Fox was so sure Star Wars was going to be a disaster that they came within a matter of days of selling off their stake in the film as a tax shelter. Positive feedback from an advanced screening made them change their minds, and the profits from the film ended up saving the studio from bankruptcy.

Chewbacca was modeled after George Lucas's dog, Indiana. See also Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989).

The sounds of the lasers were made by striking one of the guy wires of a power pylon.

According to the exhibit at the Smithsonian, the sound of a TIE fighter is created by combining the squeal of a young elephant with the sound of a car driving by on a rain-slicked highway.

Harrison Ford deliberately didn't learn his lines for the intercom conversation in the cell block, so it would sound spontaneous.

The Chewbacca suit retained a bad smell for the duration of filming after the trash-compactor scene.

Cardboard cutouts are used for some of the background starfighters in the Rebel hanger bay.

Mark Hamill held his breath for so long during the trash compactor scene that he broke a blood vessel in his face. Subsequent shots are from one side only.

Most of the crowd watching the heroes receive their medallions are cardboard cutouts.

The model used for the rebel blockade runner (the first ship seen in the first scene of the film) has a tiny Star Wars movie poster and a tiny Playboy centerfold in its cockpit. These aren't visible on screen, though.

The language spoken by the Jawas was created by recording speakers of the African Zulu language and electronically speeding it up. Greedo's language is the Peruvian Indian language Quechua, played backwards. (George Lucas would later feature Peruvian Indians again in Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)).

The sequence where Luke returns to the farm is identical to The Searchers (1956), when the farm has been burned by Indians

Denis Lawson, who played Wedge Antilles (his name is misspelt in the credits as "Dennis Lawson"), is the uncle of Ewan McGregor, who plays Obi-Wan Kenobi in the prequels. See also Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi (1983).

A small pair of metal dice can be seen hanging in the cockpit of the Millennium Falcon as Chewbacca makes preparations to depart from Mos Eisley. They don't appear in subsequent scenes.

George Lucas insisted that he have merchandising rights to the film. Studio executives, seeing little if any profit from such merchandise, gave him the rights for free. Star Wars related merchandise has since generated many millions of dollars in sales, allowing Lucas to make movies completely independent of the studio system he decried. Merchandising rights are now a major part of any film contract.

The word "Jedi" is derived from the Japanese words "Jidai Geki" which translate as "period drama." A period drama is a Japanese TV soap opera program set in the samurai days. George Lucas mentioned in an interview that he saw a "Jidai Geki" program on TV while in Japan a year or so before the movie was made and liked the word.

Scenes featuring Luke and his Tatooine friend "Biggs" were cut from the film. Biggs was a young pilot who left the Imperial Academy to join the Rebellion. Luke mentions him to his "aunt" and "uncle" during the breakfast scene, and the character later shows up as a Rebel pilot who accompanies Luke down the final run on the Death Star trench.

Chewbacca's "voice" is a combination of several animals including bears, badgers, walrus and camels.

The sounds made by Chewbacca are actually recordings of sounds made by Polar Bears.

The filming of the special effects sequences at ILM's studio was interrupted at one point by a visit by representatives from the local camera operators union who were insisting that ILM hire union camera operators. Someone programmed the Dykstraflex camera to perform a complex series of moves that ended with the camera being pointed at the faces of the union reps. At this point the union reps were told, "Send us someone who can operate *that*." The union reps left and were not heard from again.

The terms "X-wing" and "Y-wing" and "TIE fighter" were used by ILM effects guys to distinguish the fighters. These terms are not used in this film, though they were incorporated into the sequels. They also became popular with the public after the toys and the Making of special aired on tv. In addition, ILM's special effects staff nicknamed the Millennium Falcon "The Porkburger" but this never caught on.

(19 comments | Leave a comment)

Comments
 
[User Picture]
From:ninquelosse
Date:May 8th, 2005 05:03 am (UTC)
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Ros... I'm weeping. They made Narnia so big, and bright, and beautiful. I love Pauline Baynes, sure; but her artwork was not exactly majestic. This... wow. I pray they haven't shown us the best of what they have, and that the kids are up to the challenge. Lucy looks amazing.

Very happy. Thanks.
[User Picture]
From:rosamundeb
Date:May 8th, 2005 05:05 am (UTC)
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"bright" - YES! As if the air is brighter and clearer there! Exactly. The colors so rich, and all of it just looks... right. And I agree - the kids look right as well.

Squeeee!!! *S*
[User Picture]
From:anonypooh
Date:May 8th, 2005 08:55 am (UTC)
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Thanks for the link!

That IS totally beautiful! I haven't read Narnia since I was wee ... but I can't wait for the movie and all those that follow. This is going to be huge.
[User Picture]
From:rosamundeb
Date:May 8th, 2005 05:22 pm (UTC)
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*crosses fingers*

Trailers never lie... right? *G*

Damn them - we have to wait until Christmas!

*sigh*

But, then again... that makes it even more like LOTR....

*hope springs*
[User Picture]
From:freakspawn
Date:May 9th, 2005 12:35 pm (UTC)
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I love Narnia:D
[User Picture]
From:freakspawn
Date:May 9th, 2005 12:34 pm (UTC)
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I can't wait to see Narnia....but damn them! WHY do they NEVER start from the beginning????
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From:rosamundeb
Date:May 9th, 2005 01:27 pm (UTC)
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Huh-wuh? Come on, it's the first book!

I'm guessing you mean that other books go back and explore what happened beforehand... but putting it in chronological order like that wouldn't be any fun. *G*
[User Picture]
From:freakspawn
Date:May 9th, 2005 01:30 pm (UTC)
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Actually The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe is the second book...
[User Picture]
From:rosamundeb
Date:May 9th, 2005 01:31 pm (UTC)
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Not back when I bought them... *G*. The sets I've seen have always started with that as the first in the series. Now I think that there's the one that shows how (is it the professor? grandfather? I always forget) got the wardrobe, but I thought that was written later?
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From:freakspawn
Date:May 9th, 2005 01:35 pm (UTC)
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I've just been reading about it all, I must be the only person who read them in the actual numbered order! hahaha

Apparently the order in which they were published is not necessarily the order in which they were written. LWW was published first but is not book 1 in the series, however CS Lewis said that he didn't really mind which order people read them in...

Didn't realise it, but there was controversy surrounding it all....
[User Picture]
From:rosamundeb
Date:May 9th, 2005 01:36 pm (UTC)
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*ggl* I think we posted simultaneously! *G*
[User Picture]
From:freakspawn
Date:May 9th, 2005 01:37 pm (UTC)
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you know what I think we did:D
[User Picture]
From:rosamundeb
Date:May 9th, 2005 01:36 pm (UTC)
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Aha! I did a bit of yahooing and found the following... which explains the confusion of both of us!:

The order in which the Narnia Chronicles should be read and published is a matter of great controversy. In my view, the answer to this question lies in a proper understanding of the deeper level of Narnia. When read on an adult level, the Narnia Chronicles function as a powerful medium used by Lewis to impart powerful spiritual truths about Christianity and theology. But these spiritual truths are conveyed more by Biblical allusions than by rigid allegory. This also has implications for the order of the volumes in this series.
The publishers of this edition have elected to follow the chronological order of the series: 1. The Magician's Nephew; 2. The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe; 3. The Horse and His Boy; 4. Prince Caspian; 5. The Voyage of the Dawn Treader; 6. The Silver Chair; 7. The Last Battle. The chronological order makes the books more strictly allegorical than they really were intended to be, and gives the impression that they are an extended allegory rather than incidental allusions, an incorrect impression in my view. Despite all the talk about allegory, it seems to me that Lewis is more fond of incorporating Biblical allusions where and when he pleases, rather than working with a strict and rigid allegory that tightly binds the plot. Certainly the central Biblical themes of creation, fall, redemption and consummation are present, and form the broad chronological coat-hanger on which the series rests. But ultimately Lewis does not want us to become obsessed with chronology, but with content.

Thus there is something to the vehemence with which so many readers argue that the books must be read in the order in which they were first published, namely: 1. The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe; 2. Prince Caspian; 3. The Voyage of the Dawn Treader; 4. The Silver Chair; 5. The Horse and His Boy; 6. The Magician's Nephew; 7. The Last Battle. While it is true that this originally published order is not chronological, it does enhance the process of discovery about the magical world of Narnia, and slowly uncovers various aspects of its history.

It must be conceded that in a letter written in 1957 (published in "Letters to Children"), Lewis did appear to state a mild preference for the chronological order. But in that same letter Lewis concluded: "So perhaps it does not matter very much in which order anyone read them." Surely Lewis' own conclusion is correct. Although my personal thoughts are that the originally published order is perhaps to be marginally preferred, in the end each book is a separate story and an independent glimpse into the exciting world of Narnia. It is the understanding of the allusions that deserves our attention, not an artificial reconstruction of a complicated allegory. These allusions do not need to be artificially joined together in a strict chronological sequence to be enjoyed - they are equally profound and enjoyable as they were read by the first readers, namely, in the originally published order.


[User Picture]
From:freakspawn
Date:May 9th, 2005 01:38 pm (UTC)
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The first time I picked them up I had the whole set, and so I read The Magician's Nephew first, so to me it will always be number 1 hahaha:)
[User Picture]
From:rosamundeb
Date:May 9th, 2005 01:48 pm (UTC)
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:P!!! *G* Whereas, here, traditionally, it's always been "The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe"; it's the most-read by far. And, to be honest - the only one I remember the plot of! Probably because it stands alone so well, and is such a good introduction to Narnia overall. I'll have to go back and read the rest, now!
[User Picture]
From:freakspawn
Date:May 9th, 2005 01:57 pm (UTC)
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heehee, and it is my least favourite of the set!

My favourite by far is Voyage of the Dawntreader:D You should definately go back and re-read them all they are brilliant!
[User Picture]
From:ninquelosse
Date:May 9th, 2005 11:03 pm (UTC)
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Dawn Treader is the best. All my friends wanted to meet Reepicheep. And the Magician's island! The whole story is marvellous.
[User Picture]
From:freakspawn
Date:May 10th, 2005 07:09 am (UTC)
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Reepicheep is amazing...

I want to drink the water!! Yep the story is marvellous indeed.
From:(Anonymous)
Date:November 29th, 2005 12:20 am (UTC)
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I think that LWW should come first because it introduces you to Narnia much better than TMN, because there's more of a story and a plot in it, while it introduces you to Narnia, whereas TMN is mostly background. Sure, there's a little plot involved, but I think it's mostly to answer questions like "Who Exactly IS this White Witch person exactly?" and things like that. LWW focuses more on the individual characters. You'd know exactly what one of the Pevensies would say in any given situation, but with Digory and Polly? TMN is more about Narnia in general, because Narnia continues, you see. But Digory and Polly don't (well, not until the Last Battle, and a little bit in LWW with Digory). I'd say, overall, the character with the most character development is Eustace. Or Aslan.
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